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#1 Laney

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 03:16 PM

I've been watching E.R on my laptop and in one of the episodes, there's a mom who just had a baby girl and named her Cher, only she spelled it Chair. Even one of the main characters, Abby pointed that out to her. The mom wanted her kid's name to be different or unique. I forget the exact words she said, but I felt really bad for the kid (yeah, I know these are fictional characters, but I can't help it. lol). Thoughts?



#2 DanielleH

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 06:57 PM

This happens a lot in real life. Some parents want their kids to have exclusive and extremely unique names. Sometimes it works, but most part of the time we came across these questionable names (misspelled, invented, with bad meanings).



#3 Laney

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 07:35 PM

This happens a lot in real life. Some parents want their kids to have exclusive and extremely unique names. Sometimes it works, but most part of the time we came across these questionable names (misspelled, invented, with bad meanings).

Yep!  Just look on some of the online baby nurseries.  There's a bunch of weird, misspelled, and invented names on them.  But what a lot of people don't seem to realize is that the "unique" name they choose for their children is often not really unique at all.  Cher is unusual, but it's not exclusive (the singer, the main character from "Clueless", and actress Cher Butler).  Changing the spelling doesn't make it more unique.



#4 DanielleH

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 08:08 PM

And changing Cher to Chair is definitely not a good idea, unless you want to honor your furniture...


In my country, we had a very restricted name list until a few months ago. It was irritating because we couldn't use names like William, Dylan, Mel for girls, unisex names, internacional spellings like Sophia,... I almost gave a party when the legislation was changed but, from another perspective, I have to admit that the list had good aspects: We couldn't use misspelled names, 'unique' names, names that could cause embarrassment,...
I mean, this is an endless discussion. Everyone has a different vision about names. Some people are very traditional, others like to be very creative. I just think we should consider the children's future. We can be creative without putting our children in weird situations.

'Hi, please have a sit! What's your name?'
'Chair.'

#5 Laney

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 08:53 PM

And changing Cher to Chair is definitely not a good idea, unless you want to honor your furniture...


In my country, we had a very restricted name list until a few months ago. It was irritating because we couldn't use names like William, Dylan, Mel for girls, unisex names, internacional spellings like Sophia,... I almost gave a party when the legislation was changed but, from another perspective, I have to admit that the list had good aspects: We couldn't use misspelled names, 'unique' names, names that could cause embarrassment,...
I mean, this is an endless discussion. Everyone has a different vision about names. Some people are very traditional, others like to be very creative. I just think we should consider the children's future. We can be creative without putting our children in weird situations.

'Hi, please have a sit! What's your name?'
'Chair.'

Spelling your kid's name "Chair" is like putting a giant 'kick me' sign on her back.  It's child cruelty.

 

We need some laws here in the US to prevent certain names from being given. Not as restrictive as some of the laws were in your country, but boys' names for girls, tryndee/"kreative" names/spellings, pets' names, names of food and drinks, cars, titles and ranks, most countries/states (Georgia, Virginia, and Carolina are fine, others not so much), random words, and names with obviously unfortunate associations are horrible and should be banned.  William, Dylan for a boy, and Sophia are perfectly fine. They're nice normal names, popularity aside.  Mel is okay, but better as a nickname for Melody, Melanie, or something else that's more formal.

 

Some names may sound "cute" when your kid is a baby, but not when he/she is a teen or adult.   I am kind of traditional in my naming style, though I prefer something not too common (preferably a FN not in the top 200 and a classic MN.  I also love some Irish, Latvian, and other international names as long as they aren't too out there for English speakers). A majority of creative names/spellings don't feel professional.  I think people should have names that feel sophisticated no matter  how old you are.  Trendy and creative names rarely do.



#6 brimariiee

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Posted 22 March 2018 - 03:51 PM

Cher isn't weird to use.
Spelling it Chair and pronouncing it like Cher or just the name spelled Chair in general, is a little odd.

However, I overall think everyone is too quick to judge people's choices. Unless it's something that will cause serious damage (which I can't even think of a specific example at the moment other than a curse word) I say to each their own. If someone is going to bully someone else, they'll find anything whether they have a common name or a unique name. There's plenty of worse parenting decisions out there than a "bad name".



#7 Laney

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Posted 22 March 2018 - 05:01 PM

Cher isn't weird to use.
Spelling it Chair and pronouncing it like Cher or just the name spelled Chair in general, is a little odd.

However, I overall think everyone is too quick to judge people's choices. Unless it's something that will cause serious damage (which I can't even think of a specific example at the moment other than a curse word) I say to each their own. If someone is going to bully someone else, they'll find anything whether they have a common name or a unique name. There's plenty of worse parenting decisions out there than a "bad name".

Yep, Cher is okay.  Chair is ridiculous.



#8 DanielleH

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 07:33 PM

Spelling your kid's name "Chair" is like putting a giant 'kick me' sign on her back.  It's child cruelty.
 
We need some laws here in the US to prevent certain names from being given. Not as restrictive as some of the laws were in your country, but boys' names for girls, tryndee/"kreative" names/spellings, pets' names, names of food and drinks, cars, titles and ranks, most countries/states (Georgia, Virginia, and Carolina are fine, others not so much), random words, and names with obviously unfortunate associations are horrible and should be banned.  William, Dylan for a boy, and Sophia are perfectly fine. They're nice normal names, popularity aside.  Mel is okay, but better as a nickname for Melody, Melanie, or something else that's more formal.
 
Some names may sound "cute" when your kid is a baby, but not when he/she is a teen or adult.   I am kind of traditional in my naming style, though I prefer something not too common (preferably a FN not in the top 200 and a classic MN.  I also love some Irish, Latvian, and other international names as long as they aren't too out there for English speakers). A majority of creative names/spellings don't feel professional.  I think people should have names that feel sophisticated no matter  how old you are.  Trendy and creative names rarely do.



I think all countries should allowed parents to use the names that exist in other cultures and languages, at least the most commons and the classics.
But I also agreed that in some cases, people shouldn't be allowed to use names that cause extreme embarrassed. Of course, some names work in some countries but would never work in others...
Ex: Lapis - Persian female name - means pencil in Portuguese

I leave here some names that can be used now in my country:
Excel
Bronoealfate
M'ma
Djhennyfer
Tsz

#9 Laney

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 08:55 PM

I think all countries should allowed parents to use the names that exist in other cultures and languages, at least the most commons and the classics.
But I also agreed that in some cases, people shouldn't be allowed to use names that cause extreme embarrassed. Of course, some names work in some countries but would never work in others...
Ex: Lapis - Persian female name - means pencil in Portuguese

I leave here some names that can be used now in my country:
Excel
Bronoealfate
M'ma
Djhennyfer
Tsz

International names are great, but like you said, some names don't cross cultures very well.  But names like Sophia/Sofia, Isabelle/Isabel/Isobel/Isabella, Anna, Joseph/Josef, Thomas/Tomas, and Daniel work very well.  Chloe (sounds similar to "klo" which is German slang for "toilet"), Siri (pronounced a lot like the A word [another name for "butt"] in Japanese, and then there's the personal assistant thingy), Randy (means "prostitute" in Hindi, and it's also slang in English.  At least in English, it's acceptable as a nickname for Randall, Randolph, or Miranda), Jezebel (doesn't work here in the US, considering its unfortunate association), or Mort (means "dead" in Old French) don't sound so nice in the languages I mentioned.  Pippa also has a horrible meaning in Italian, but it's fine here.

 

M'Ma and Djhennyfer are ridiculous spellings of Emma and Jennifer, which are perfectly normal names.  The others you listed are a pain to look at too, and I don't even know where to begin with trying to pronounce them properly (except Excel, which is pretty straightforward, but it's just setting the kid up for bullying).






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